International Symposium on STEM Education (ISSE) 2015

Warmly welcome!

The 5th ISSE will be organized in Joensuu, Finland, from 1st to 3rd June, 2015.

We have the honour and pleasure to invite you to Joensuu, Finland, 1st – 3rd June 2015, to the 5th International Symposium on STEM Education. The symposium is organized by LUMA Centre Finland.

STEM education is constantly undergoing major changes and developments, and new approaches to STEM education are needed.

We welcome STEM teachers from all educational levels, prospective teachers, teacher educators and researchers in STEM education to attend this symposium to share ideas on STEM education and to discuss new developments in the field. The symposium is based on plenary lectures, discussion sessions and some hands-on activities.

ISSE 2015 is organized at the same time as National LUMA (STEM) days for Finnish teachers etc. The programme is partly the same. The language of the ISSE is mostly English, partly Finnish.


Monday, 1st June

11.00–
(Agora building)
Registration
Exhibition and posters
11.00–13.00
(restauranta Aura, Aurora building & restaurant Carelia, Carelia building)
Networking Lunch
13.00–15.00
(auditorium C1, Carelia building)
Opening (director, Prof. Maija Aksela & chair of the board, Assoc. Prof. Pekka Hirvonen, LUMA Centre Finland) – partly in Finnish, partly in English

Welcome (Academic Rector Jaakko Puhakka, University of Eastern Finland) – partly in Finnish, partly in English

Welcome (Dr. Àgueda Gras-Velázquez, European Schoolnet) – in English

International Year of Light 2015 (Prof. Pasi Vahimaa, Finnish Programme Group for the International Year of Light 2015) – partly in Finnish, partly in English

15.00–16.00
(Agora building)
Coffee break
Exhibition and posters
16.00–16.40
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
LUMA FINLAND development programme (Prof. Maija Aksela, Assoc. Prof. Pekka Hirvonen, Prof. Peter Hästö & Prof. Tapio Salakoski)
16.45–17.25
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Argumentation in School Science (Jonathan Osborne, Stanford University)
17.30–18.10
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
EUN projects supporting STEM education (Dr. Àgueda Gras-Velázquez, European Schoolnet)
18.15–18.55
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Changing the world: Students’ perspective for sustainable development in science education (Researcher Sakari Tolppanen, University of Helsinki)

Tuesday, 2nd June

8.30-
(Agora building)
Registration
9.00–10.00
(auditorium C1, Carelia building)
Keynote Lecture: New Directions in Teaching Science: The US Next Generation Science Standards and their implications for the teaching of science (Prof. Jonathan Osborne, Stanford University)

Lecture: Curriculum Reform in Finland (Counsellor Tiina Tähkä, Finnish National Board of Education FNBE) – partly in Finnish, partly in English

10.00–11.00
(auditorium C1, Carelia building)
Panel Discussion: Näkökulmia esi- ja perusopetuksen sekä lukion uudistuviin opetussuunnitelmiin (Curriculum Reform for pre-school, comprehensive school and high school) (Tero Anttila, The Finnish Association for Teachers of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Informatics (MAOL); professor Sirkka-Liisa Eriksson, Tampere University of Technology; Marja Happonen, MAOL; professor Peter Hästö, Oulun yliopisto; special planner Merike Kesler, Development Centre Opinkirjo; Sirpa Kärkkäinen, The Finnish Association for Teachers of Biology and Geography (BMOL); senior lecturer Anna-Maija Partanen, University of Lapland; advisor Anni Siltanen, The Chemical Industry Federation of Finland; counsellor Jukka Tulivuori, FNBE & counsellor Tiina Tähkä, FNBE) – in Finnish
11.00–11.30
(auditorium C1, Carelia building)
LUMA Awards 2015partly in Finnish, partly in English
11.30–13.00
(restauranta Aura, Aurora building & restaurant Carelia, Carelia building)
Networking Lunch
11.30–13.00
(Agora building)
Exhibition and posters
13.00–13.40
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Finnish curriculum in math and science education (Counsellor Tiina Tähkä, FNBE)
13.45–14.25
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Building Blocks for High Quality Teacher Education: Reflections based on Finnish Experiences (Prof. Jari Lavonen, University of Helsinki)
14.30–15.10
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
How secondary school students like to study biology? Teaching methods most liked (Prof. Anna Uitto, University of Helsinki)
15.15–15.45
(Agora building)
Coffee break
Exhibition and posters
15.45–16.25
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Science teachers’ ICT use and in-service training in Finland (Dr. Satu Helppolainen, University of Helsinki)
16.30–17.10
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
New innovations in Finnish Geography education (Dr. Rami Ratvio, University of Helsinki)
17.15–17.55
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Teacher growth (Dr. Päivi Portaankorva-Koivisto, University of Helsinki)
20.00–
(Theatre Restaurant)
Symposium Dinner (not included in the symposium fee, ca. 35 EUR/person)

Wednesday 3rd June

8.30-
(Agora building)
Registration
9.00–10.00
(auditorium AU100, Aurora building)
Video Lecture: Transferring the Matriculation Examination on the ICT (General Secretary Kaisa Vähähyyppä, Finnish Matriculation Examination Board – partly in Finnish, partly in English

Lecture: Digital exams in applying, evaluating and creating knowledge (Prof. Ismo Koponen, University of Helsinki – partly in Finnish, partly in English

10.00–11.00
(auditorium AU100, Aurora building)
Panel Discussion: Näkökulmia sähköisistä oppimisympäristöistä ja sähköisestä arvioinnista (Digital Learning Environments and Digital Assessment) (Ismo Koponen, University of Helsinki; Mikko-Jussi Laakso, University of Turku; Johannes Pernaa, E-Oppi Ltd & Maarit Rossi, Paths to Math Ltd) – in Finnish
11.00–12.00
(restauranta Aura, Aurora building & restaurant Carelia, Carelia building)
Networking Lunch
11.00–12.00
(Agora building)
Exhibition and posters
12.00–12.40
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
From theory to practice – From planning to reflection on communicative approaches (Sami Lehesvuori, University of Jyväskylä)
12.45–13.25
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Technology supported tutorial-based collaborative learning using automated assessment and immediate feedback for coding at school (Mikko-Jussi Laakso, University of Turku)
13.30–14.15
(Agora building)
Coffee break
Exhibition and posters
14.15–14.55
(auditorium AG100, Agora building)
Laboratory of modern physics for upper secondary students (Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)
15.00–16.00
(auditorium AU100, Aurora building)
Closing (Maija Aksela & Pekka Hirvonen) – partly in Finnish, partly in English

 


Venue

ISSE 2015 takes place at the Joensuu campus of the University of Eastern Finland. The campus is located within an approximately 15 minute walk away from the Joensuu city centre.

The opening of the symposium will happen in the Agora building at Yliopistokatu 4.


Registration

Registration closes on 17th May, 2015.

Registration form »

N. B. Service break in the system on Sunday, 10th May.

Symposium fees

  • 1 day 40 EUR (incl. VAT 0 %)
  • 2 days 80 EUR (incl. VAT 0 %)
  • all 3 days 120 EUR (incl. VAT 0 %)

Included in the fee are

  • All sessions
  • Symposium materials
  • Lunches and coffee breaks during the symposium

The fee should be paid by credit card (MasterCard / Visa / Visa Electron) via the registration form. Paying by credit card is the only payment option available.


Social Programme

Events related to the Symposium

Monday, 1st June

20.00 Reception

Tuesday, 2nd June

20.00 Symposium Dinner

Other possibilites

There is a lot to do in Joensuu and its surroundings during summertime. Here are some examples:

  • Botania (Botanical garden and tropical butterfly garden)

See also:


Committees

Scientific Committee

The scientific committee has planned and built the programme for ISSE 2015.

  • director, professor Maija Aksela, LUMA Centre Finland (chair for the committee)
  • assoc. professor Pekka Hirvonen, University of Eastern Finland (physics)
  • researcher Mikko-Jussi Laakso, University of Turku (ICT)
  • senior lecturer Päivi Portaankorva-Koivisto, University of Helsinki (mathematics)
  • senior lecturer Rami Ratvio, University of Helsinki (geography)
  • professor Anna Uitto, University of Helsinki (biology)
  • coordinator Lauri Vihma, LUMA Centre Finland (secretary for the committee)
  • university teacher Jouni Välisaari, University of Jyväskylä (chemistry)

Organizing Committee

Practical arrangements are handled by the organizing committee.

  • Mikko Kesonen, LUMA Centre of the University of Eastern Finland
  • coordinator Anniina Koliseva, Central Finland LUMA Centre
  • coordinator Kati Kyllönen, LUMA Centre of the University of Oulu
  • coordinator Markku Leino, LUMA Centre of Southwestern Finland
  • coordinator Kirsi Lindqvist, LUMA Centre Päijät-Häme
  • coordinator Ville Manninen, LUMA Centre Saimaa
  • coordinator Ville Nivalainen, LUMA Centre of the University of Eastern Finland (chair of the committee)
  • coordinator Susanna Petäjistö, Tampereen LUMATE-keskus
  • communications coordinator Maija Pollari, LUMA Centre Finland (communication and marketing)
  • coordinator Pirjo Putila, LUMA Centre Aalto
  • coordinator Pieti Tolvanen, LUMA Centre Lapland
  • coordinator Lauri Vihma, LUMA Centre of the University of Helsinki
  • coordinator Tiina Ylä-Kero, LUMA Centre of Central Ostrobothnia

Travel

Travel to Finland

The easiest way to travel to Finland is by plane to Helsinki Airport.

Travel to Joensuu

The city of Joensuu is located in eastern part of Finland, about 450 km / 280 miles from Helsinki, the capital of Finland, close to the Russian border. From Helsinki, you can access Joensuu by airplane, by train or by bus.

By plane
The national carrier of Finland, Finnair, flies between Helsinki and Joensuu 2-5 times a day.

By train
The train from Helsinki to Joensuu (operated by VR) will take about 4.5 hours.


Accommodation

The hotels listed below have a room quota reserved for participants in the ISSE 2015, from 1st to 3rd June 2015.

The room reservation has to be made directly to the hotel, via their website or by phone. Please remember to include the booking code when making the reservation.

There might be some changes to the room prices shown on this page. (The LUMA Centre Finland / the University of Eastern Finland does not take responsibility over the changes done after the room quota was agreed on.) Please note that we have reserved a quota of rooms for each hotel and the quota might be full by the time you are making the reservation.

Please also note that all the quotas have dates on when the booking has to be made by and after that date there is no guarantee you will be able to reserve a room in that hotel.

The room fee is paid directly to the hotel.

Hotel Room price per night Rooms available Booking has to be made by Booking code
Hotel Aada, Kauppakatu 32 72 EUR / single
80 EUR / double
(breakfast included in the prices)
15 single rooms
8 double rooms
30th April 2015 LUMA
Sokos Hotel Kimmel, Itäranta 1 87 EUR / economy single
97 EUR / standard single
117 EUR / superior single
107 EUR / economy double
117 EUR / standard double
137 EUR / superior double
(breakfast included in the prices)
altogether 70 rooms 30th April 2015 BLUMA
Sokos Hotel Vaakuna, Torikatu 20 101 EUR / single
121 EUR / double
(breakfast included in the prices)
altogether 50 rooms 30th April 2015 BLUMA
Hotel GreenStar, Torikatu 16 62.50 EUR / room
(breakfast: 7 EUR / person / night)
altogether 40 rooms 30th April 2015 LUMA

There are also rooms in the Cumulus Hotel Joensuu but there isn’t any room quota reserved.


Abstracts


Argumentation in School Science (professor Jonathan Osborne, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University, USA)

This workshop covers various aspects of the use of an argument in school science by focusing on

1. Why does argument in science matter?
2. What does an argument consist of?
3. What are the best structures for supporting an argument in science?

The workshop will be held in English, but the materials will be available in both Finnish and English. Welcome!

Presentation » (PDF)


Building Blocks for High Quality Teacher Education: Reflections based on Finnish Experiences (Professor Jari Lavonen, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Finland)

Primary and secondary (subject) teacher education program at the university of Helsinki will be introduced. First, the characteristics of the Finnish education context are discussed at different levels, starting from the educational policy, organisation and school level and ending up at the classroom level including issues concerning the individual science teacher’s role in the classroom. Second, teacher education, i.e. how the student teachers become professionals in curriculum design and instructional and assessment methodologies, is analysed. Special attention is paid to the challenges of the 21st century.


Changing the world: Students’ perspective for sustainable development in science education (Researcher Sakari Tolppanen, Unit of Chemistry Teacher Education, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Finland)

This presentation, describes how education for sustainable development (ESD) can be made more relevant for young students in science education, especially in chemistry. First, it examines the type of questions students ask about sustainable development, and climate change in specific, showing that questions range from scientific questions to societal and moral questions. Secondly, the presentation discusses the type of actions students are already doing to make the world a better place and their reasons for taking action. The results show that students take personal responsible actions, participatory actions and future oriented actions. Thirdly, the presentation examines what type of expectations students have when applying to a non-formal educational program related to sustainable development. The results show that in addition to their academic interests, students have strong social and ethical interests to attend. Finally, the presentation describes how students’ questions and expectations can be met through non-formal education. Based on the findings, the study concludes that ESD could be made more relevant by moving into more student-centered education. This can be done by incorporating students’ questions and actions into education, as well as providing relevant non-formal education to support students’ further interest in ESD. The presentation is built around data from the six research articles written for a PhD thesis. The data was collected from 16-19 year old students applying to or attending an international youth camp and was analyzed mainly by inductive and deductive content analysis.


EUN projects supporting STEM education (Dr. Àgueda Gras-Velázquez, European Schoolnet)

From nanotechnologies to remote labs, European Schoolnet has been involved in Science education projects for many years. In this presentation we will highlight a few examples of activities and lessons learned, all now under the umbrella of Scientix, the community for Science Education in Europe.


Finnish curriculum in math and science education (counsellor Tiina Tähkä, Finnish National Board of Education)

What are the features of Finnish curriculum system? What are the cornerstones of math and science education in Finland?

Presentation » (PDF)


From theory to practice – From planning to reflection on communicative approaches (Ph.D. Sami Lehesvuori, Department of Teacher Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

This presentation addresses how science teachers are able to implement different communicative approaches in practice in science classrooms. Especially student-centred and dialogic teaching approaches are increasingly gaining ground especially among scholars in the field of classroom interaction. This is, however, often not the case in classroom realities. In this presentation carefully selected examples of communicative approaches are presented. In order to access the gap between theory and practice, methods for planning and reflecting on different communicative approaches are brought up and discussed.


How secondary school students like to study biology? Teaching methods most liked (Prof. Anna Uitto, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Finland)

The presentation discusses the results of the research studying teaching methods and approaches used in the Finnish secondary school biology lessons. Interest is known to be linked to effective learning and positive attitudes towards school biology. It can be assumed that teaching and learning approaches influence students’ motivation to study biology. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) is considered as an approach that engages students to learn. For instance student-centred approaches such as making observations and experiments, applying learned issues to everyday life, discussing the causes and effects and different viewpoints to the studied biological phenomena are found to be linked to performance in biology as well as interest and positive attitudes towards biology in the lower secondary school. Students like ICT and especially interactive working methods too, but these methods have not been found to influence learning. In the upper secondary school students desire more often lab and field work and visits out-side the school than is implemented in the biology lessons. Direct teaching, copying notes or making paper-and-pencil assignments are less popular among students, when compared to the prevalence of these methods in the upper secondary school biology. However, teacher-led approaches are also liked in the secondary school, indicating that students feel to need guided instruction. It can be assumed that both guided instruction and IBL approach are important approaches to make biology learning effective and interesting for the secondary school students.


Laboratory of modern physics for upper secondary students (Researcher Miikka de Vocht, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Finland)

In the F2k-laboratory, which is a part of LUMA Center of the University of Helsinki, visitors get to experimentally explore the change that happened from classical physics to quantum physics in the early 20th century. Since 2011 about 30 upper secondary groups have visited the F2k-laboratory annually. These laboratory sessions are typically organized in conjunction with a visit to the Physics department of the University of Helsinki; students deepen their knowledge about modern physics whilst exploring further education. Experiments include the electron charge per mass ratio, photoelectric effect, Millikan oil-drop experiment, black-body radiation and spectral analysis. The presentation covers an overview of the F2k-laboratory; experiments and their relevance to the birth of quantum physics, structure of an F2k visit and some educational aspects related to visiting the F2k-laboratory.

Presentation » (PDF)


LUMA FINLAND development programme (Prof. Maija Aksela, Assoc. Prof. Pekka Hirvonen, Prof. Peter Hästö & Prof. Tapio Salakoski, LUMA Centre Finland)

The LUMA FINLAND programme carried out by the LUMA Centre Finland is aiming to inspire and engage 6-16 year-olds in the importance of science, technology and mathematics. The programme will draw on current education research to design and implement new teaching methods, learning environments and materials for schools. The programme will develop new methods and resources to inspire children and youth towards STEM and to increase their skills and knowledge. The programme will work together with teachers, students, families, schools and policy makers. The six-year (2014-2019) national development programme is funded by the Ministry of Education and Culture.


New Directions in Teaching Science: The US Next Generation Science Standards and their implications for the teaching of science (professor Jonathan Osborne, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University, USA)

This presentation will introduce the Next Generation Science Standards which are currently being implemented in thirteen states in the USA. These standards present science as a set of core ideas, eight scientific practices and seven cross-cutting concepts. The major innovation is the change from teaching science as inquiry to teaching a set of eight scientific practices. As one of the individuals who sat on the panel who wrote the document that forms the basis for these standards – the Framework for K-12 Science Education, I shall explore the rationale for this change, why it is seen as an improvement, and the implications for science teaching.

Presentation » (PDF)


Science teachers’ ICT use and in-service training in Finland (Dr. Satu Helppolainen, Unit of Chemistry Teacher Education, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Finland)

The use of ICT is a central aim at Finnish national curriculum framework. In the first part of this presentation results of an ICT survey of Finnish science teachers will be introduced. Especially, teachers’ ICT skills, knowledge and beliefs, challenges and also current need for ICT training will be presented. In the second part of the presentation a new model of the ICT in-service training course of science teachers and its’ results will be presented. The distance learning course was hold in the spring 2015 in a collaboration with four universities in Finland. The course was open for all subject teachers in science from primary school to high school and vocational school.


Teacher growth (University Lecturer Päivi Portaankorva-Koivisto, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Finland)

Teacher’s professional growth is changes in teacher’s practices, knowledge, images, beliefs and conceptions. Novice teachers accomplish three primary tasks during their first year of teaching: they acquire knowledge of pupils, use that knowledge to modify and reconstruct their personal images of self as teacher, and develop standard procedural routines that integrate classroom management and instruction. (Kagan, 1992) In this presentation I will first focus on a follow-up study, which has already been completed. The Finland-Chile project 2010-2013 (project number #135556) was funded by the Academy of Finland. Once a month, the participating primary teachers in the project conducted a mathematics lesson where their pupils solved one open problem-solving task. In this presentation I will examine two primary teachers and their guiding process during the problem-solving lessons, as examples of experienced teachers’ professional development. Second, I will tell some results of prospective mathematics teachers’ professional development during the teacher education. This study sought to investigate mathematics student teachers’ metaphors for mathematics, teaching, and the teacher’s role.

Presentation » (PDF)


Technology supported tutorial-based collaborative learning using automated assessment and immediate feedback for coding at school (Mikko-Jussi Laakso, University of Turku, Finland)

ViLLE is a collaborative education platform developed at the University of Turku. With ViLLE, teachers can easily create virtual courses and various types of automatically assessed exercises with immediate feedback. All created resources can be shared, commented and evaluated by other teachers. ViLLE automatically gathers huge amount of data about students’ learning behavior and results while they are using the system. This creates new research possibilities, as huge amount of quantitative and qualitative data becomes available. ViLLE supports a variety of programming languages, and has several exercise types designed specifically for programming education.

ViLLE is currently utilized by more than 1,000 teachers and over 15,000 students around the world. The effectiveness of ViLLE has been evaluated in various scientific studies, and based on the results, ViLLE enhances students’ learning significantly. More information can be found at http://ville.cs.utu.fi.

Tutorials in ViLLE consist of various exercises combined with learning material (such as text, images, tables and videos). A single tutorial can be seen as a learning object for a specified topic, for example arrays, methods or loops. Typically, a subject is first presented, and the exercises following enable immediately practise. ViLLE tutorials support a collaborative mode, where two students share a single computer, and points gathered are awarded for both students in the team.