International Symposium on STEM Education (ISSE) 2016

Warmly welcome

We have the honour and pleasure to invite you to Lahti, Finland, from 6th to 8th June 2016, to the 6th International Symposium on STEM Education (ISSE). The symposium is organized by LUMA Centre Finland.

STEM education is constantly undergoing major changes and developments, and new approaches to STEM education are needed.

We welcome STEM teachers from all educational levels, prospective teachers, teacher educators and researchers in STEM education to attend this symposium to share ideas on STEM education and to discuss new developments in the field. The symposium is based on plenary lectures, discussion sessions and some hands-on activities.

ISSE 2016 is organized at the same time as National LUMA (STEM) days for Finnish teachers etc. The programme is partly the same.

The language of the ISSE is English. There is no registration fees.


Programme

Monday, June 6th

10.30 Registration desk opens, at the lobby, 2nd floor
11.00–13.00 Possibility for enjoying lunch (at own cost), Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
13.00–13.40 Opening words (director Maija Aksela, LUMA Centre Finland)Welcome (director Jarkko Lampiselkä, LUMA Centre Päijät-Häme) – partly in Finnish

Presentation of the Lahti University Campus (General secretary Senja Jouttimäki, Lahti University Campus) – partly in Finnish

Auditorium

13.45–14.25 Session 1

Facets of STEM Education for Sustainable Development (Ilse Bartosch)

Starting with Physics by extracting one from the surroundings (Ekaterina Teteleva & Sergey Bogdanov)

Auditorium

14.30–15.10 Session 2

Focus of socio-scientific issues in science teachers’ professional competence development in Sweden (Oleg Popov, Christina Ottander & Katarina Ottander)

Developing inquiry-based and multidisciplinary approach in a teacher professional development project (Anttoni Kervinen)

Auditorium

15.15–16.00 Coffee/tea, Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
16.00–16.40 Session 3

STEM camp – Coping with the challenges of science education in the 21st century (Ruetai Chongsrid)

Teaching Argumentation with Using Facebook Groups (Ibrahim Delen)

Auditorium

16.45–17.25 Session 4

Engineering Design Centered STEM Activities: The Participant’ Views (Faik Özgür Karataş & Miraç Aydin)

What is really STEM? Teachers’ perspectives: A case from Turkey (Ümran Betül Cebesoy & Meltem Kurtolu Erden)

Auditorium

19.00– Get together, for pre-registered participants (host: City of Lahti, director for upper secondary education Heikki Turunen), Restaurant Teivaan Lokki

Tuesday, June 7th

8.30 Registration desk opens, Lobby
9.00–9.50 Keynote: Constructing and Guiding the Discussion Culture of Mathematics Classrooms (professor Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University, California, USA)Auditorium
10.00–10.50 Panel discussion: Curriculum Reform for pre-school, comprehensive school and high school in Finlandin FinnishAuditorium
11.00–13.00 Possibility for enjoying lunch (at own cost), Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
13.00–13.35 Session 5

Thai High School Teachers’ Preparedness and Perceptions about STEM Education (Skonchai Chanunan)

Applications of STEM projects in classroom (Diler Dilaver Türe, Murat Alkın, Neriman Tekeli Hayıroğlu & Tuğba Demir)

Room 503, 5th floor

Other sessions in English at the same time

Facilitating Small Group Work: Analyzing Video Cases (Chris Rasmussen), Auditorium

13.45–14.25 Session 6

Forming Cognitive-nets & Social-nets can inspire creativity with the power of Cognitive Diversity (Altaf Qadeer)

Auditorium

Other sessions in English at the same time

The Research Interests of Professor Chris Rasmussen (Chris Rasmussen & Anna-Maija Partanen), Room 503, 5th floor

14.30–15.15 Coffee/tea, Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
15.15–15.55 Session 7

Surveys of Quebec Childrens’ Conceptions of Force, Gravity and Motion (Abdeljalil Métioui & Louis Trudel)

Promoting understanding of the concept of relative speed using a computer assisted laboratory (Louis Trudel & Abdeljalil Métioui)

Room 522, 5th floor

Other sessions in English at the same time

MAT[É]-TEMA[T] (Ann-Sofi Röj-Lindberg & Kasper Hiltunen), Room 503, 5th floor

16.00–16.40 Session 8

Exploring Design-Based Science as a STEM Approach for Understanding Force and Energy Topic (Miraç Aydin & Faik Özgür Karataş)

Factors of students’ effectiveness in solving chemistry tasks based upon sub-micro representations (Vesna Ferk Savec, Špela Svetičič, Miha Slapničar & Iztok Devetak)

Auditorium

16.45–17.25 Poster Session

Career Academy on Textile: An example of STEM curriculum in Thailand (Pornrat Wattanakasiwich)

ORT Russia – from Technology for All to STEM Education (Sergey Gorinskiy)

Promoting problem-solving skills in mechanics among college physics students (Louis Trudel & Abdeljalil Métioui)

Science Lesson with Animations (Hatice Kirmaci & Yasemin Kose)

The Development of Scientific and Pedagogy Competencies by Quebec Pre-service Primary Teachers (Abdeljalil Métioui & Louis Trudel)

Lobby, 2nd floor

Other sessions in English at the same time

STEM education in Estonia – key is in the integration of systems and cooperation (Terje Tuisk), Auditorium

19.00– Symposium dinner, for pre-registered participants (at own cost, price ca. 20…40 EUR / person), Restaurant Mamma Maria

Wednesday, June 8th

8.30 Registration desk opens, Lobby
9.00–9.20 Keynote: The Opportunities and Challenges for ICT in Science Education (professor Vesna Ferk Savec, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia)Auditorium
9.30–9.50 Lecture: Human computing
(Petri Vuorinen, IBM Finland) – in FinnishAuditorium
10.00–10.50 Movie: Veden matka (Journey of water)dubbed in Finnish (introduction by professor Petri Pellikka, Taita Research Station, University of Helsinki)Auditorium
11.00–13.00 Possibility for enjoying lunch (at own cost), Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
13.00–13.40 Session 9

CREATIONS – Developing an Engaging Science Classroom (Franz X. Bogner)

Context-based outreach to schools increases motivation and learning in chemistry (Saara Kaski)

Auditorium

13.45–14.25 Session 10

Peer review and its use in a university course (Sini Karppinen & Jokke Häsä)

Auditorium

14.30–15.15 Coffee/tea, Restaurant FellmanniaFamiliarize with sponsors’ booths and posters, Lobby
15.15–15.55 Session 11

Popularising mathematics with dialogue teaching and peer instructors (Juulia Lahdenperä & Rami Luisto)

Extreme Apprenticeship (Johanna Rämö & Lotta Oinonen)

Auditorium

Other sessions in English at the same time

Presentation of the LUMA Centre Finland (Maija Aksela), Room 522, 5th floor

16.00–16.40 Session 12

Modern Biology outreach experiments (Nastassia Racenet, Chantal Wicky & ​Marie-Pierre Chevron)

Is STEM possible for Turkey? What Teacher Educators Think about STEM? (Meltem Kurtolu Erden & Ümran Betül Cebesoy)

Auditorium

16.45–17.15 Feedback discussion & Closing words (Maija Aksela & Jarkko Lampiselkä), Auditorium

Venue

ISSE 2016 takes place at the Lahti University Campus in the Lahti city centre.

The opening of the symposium will happen in the FellmanniCampus building at Kirkkokatu 27.

Useful information

Lahti

Finland


Registration

There is no registration fees.

The registration begins on March 1st, 2016 via this website, and closes on May 22nd, 2016.

Registration form »

After successful registration, the system will automatically send you a confirmation message via e-mail (if you have written your e-mail address without mistakes). The message will contain link through which you can edit your registration or cancel it before the deadline, i.e. 22nd May.

The LUMA Centre Finland / the University of Helsinki can not provide any grants for accommodation or travelling.


Committees

Scientific Committee

The scientific committee has planned and built the programme for ISSE 2016.

  • Professor Maija Aksela, University of Helsinki – Director for LUMA Centre Finland (chair)
  • Senior lecturer Lea Kutvonen, University of Helsinki (ICT and technology education programme)
  • Senior lecturer Jarkko Lampiselkä, University of Helsinki (chemistry and physics programme for pre-school and classroom teachers, and local programme)
  • Educational planner Ann-Sofie Leppänen, Åbo Akademi University (biology programme, and programme in Swedish language)
  • Senior lecturer Sanna Mäki, University of Turku (geography programme)
  • Senior lecturer Anna-Maija Partanen, University of Lapland (mathematics programme)
  • Doctoral student Jaani Tuura, University of Turku (physics programme for subject teachers)
  • Senior lecturer Veli-Matti Vesterinen, University of Turku (chemistry programme for subject teachers)
  • Planning officer Lauri Vihma, University of Helsinki (secretary)

Organizing Committee

Practical arrangements are handled by the organizing committee.

  • Senior lecturer Jarkko Lampiselkä, University of Helsinki – Director for LUMA Centre Päijät-Häme (chair)
  • Noora Kivikko, University of Helsinki – Coordinator for LUMA Centre Päijät-Häme (secretary)
  • University teacher Leena Ikonen, Lappeenranta University of Technology – Coordinator for LUMA Centre Saimaa
  • University teacher Anniina Koliseva, University of Jyväskylä – Coordinator for Central Finland LUMA Centre
  • Planner Kati Kyllönen, University of Oulu – Coordinator for LUMA Centre of the University of Oulu
  • Project researcher Ville Nivalainen, University of Eastern Finland – Coordinator for LUMA Centre of the University of Eastern Finland
  • Planner Susanna Petäjistö, Tampere University of Technology – Executive manager for Tampere LUMATE Centre
  • Project manager Pirjo Putila, Aalto University – Coordinator for LUMA Centre Aalto
  • University teacher Lassi Pyykkö, University of Jyväskylä – Coordinator for Central Finland LUMA Centre
  • University teacher Pieti Tolvanen, University of Lapland – Coordinator for LUMA Centre Lapland
  • Doctoral student Jaani Tuura, University of Turku – Coordinator for LUMA Centre of Southwestern Finland
  • Planning officer Lauri Vihma, University of Helsinki – Coordinator for LUMA Centre of the University of Helsinki
  • Project researcher Tiina Ylä-Kero, University of Jyväskylä – Coordinator for LUMA Centre of Central Ostrobothnia

Travel

The LUMA Centre Finland / the University of Helsinki can not provide any grants for travelling.

Travel to Finland

The easiest way to travel to Finland is by plane to Helsinki Airport.

It is also possible to travel by ferry from Estonia, Germany and Sweden, or by train from Russia.

Travel to Lahti

The city of Lahti is located in southern part of Finland, about 100 km to north from Helsinki, the capital of Finland.

From Helsinki, or directly from Helsinki Airport, you can access Lahti by train or by bus.

The bus to Lahti will take about 1 hour. Timetables »

The train to Lahti will take about 1 hour. Timetables »


Accommodation

The hotels listed below have a room quota reserved for participants in the ISSE 2016, from 6th to 8th June 2016.

The room reservation has to be made directly to the hotel, via their website or by phone. Please remember to include the booking code when making the reservation.

There might be some changes to the room prices shown on this page. (The LUMA Centre Finland / the University of Helsinki does not take responsibility over the changes done after the room quota was agreed on.) Please note that we have reserved a quota of rooms for each hotel and the quota might be full by the time you are making the reservation.

Please also note that all the quotas have dates on when the booking has to be made by and after that date there is no guarantee you will be able to reserve a room in that hotel.

The room fee is paid directly to the hotel.

The LUMA Centre Finland / the University of Helsinki can not provide any grants for accommodation.

Hotel Room price per night Rooms available Booking has to be made by Booking code Bookings via
Hotelli Cumulus Lahti
Kauppakatu 10
96 EUR / standard single
116 EUR / standard double
(breakfast included in the prices)
65 standard single rooms
20 standard double rooms
15th May 2016 LUMA tel. +358 3 813 711 or lahti.cumulus@restel.fi
Kauppahotelli Grand
Hämeenkatu 4
70 EUR / standard single
84 EUR / standard double
(breakfast included in the prices)
30 standard single rooms
10 standard double rooms
6th May 2016 LUMA2016 tel. +358 3 54400 or grand@avainhotellit.fi
Scandic Lahti
Vesijärvenkatu 1
96 EUR / standard single
116 EUR / standard double
116 EUR / superior single
136 EUR / superior double
(breakfast included in the prices)
30 standard single rooms
10 standard double rooms
altogether 20 superior rooms
6th May 2016 LUMA tel. +358 3 339 3911 or lahti@scandichotels.com

There might be rooms also in the Solo Sokos Hotel Lahden Seurahuone but there isn’t any room quota reserved.

Please consider also the AirBNB in Lahti.


Abstracts

Keynotes

Constructing and Guiding the Discussion Culture of Mathematics Classrooms
(professor Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University, California, USA)

The Opportunities and Challenges for ICT in Science Education
(professor Vesna Ferk Savec, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia)
The presentation slides »

Oral presentations

Session 1

Facets of STEM Education for Sustainable Development
(Ilse Bartosch, University of Vienna, Austria)

Although science and engineering are seen as key players for ameliorating the current environmental crises due to climate change, this approach seems to be inadequate and simplistic in the face of the complexity of the problem; especially so because such an approach usually neglects the needs of the users. Giving citizens a voice in the process of research and innovation is therefore a genuine feature of sustainable development as it considers their values, needs and expectations in the design, the conduct and the outcomes of research and innovation projects. This idea is addressed by the European Commission which recently promoted the “Responsible Research and Innovation” (RRI) approach. Furthermore Hodson (2010) focuses our attention on the fact that conventional scientific literacy educational concepts fall short of preparing students for taking part in such RRI-processes. These concepts follow an economic imperative perspective in considering school science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education as the key to a country’s prosperity but do not pay explicit attention to the complex interactions between science, technology, society and environment. Yet awareness of these multiple interdependencies has to be seen as a precondition for citizens – lay-persons as well as experts – who are capable of participating in a deliberate democratic process which transforms technologically dependent societies into sustainable ones. Relying on discourse analysis of selected data provided by the ongoing research and development project “SOLARbrunn – heading for a future powered by the sun”, this paper highlights some facets of STEM education which seem to be indispensable for empowering young people to contribute to sustainable development based on research and innovation processes in the sense of RRI. For situating societal problems in STEM-education Zeidler et al. (2003) have given a framework of what they called “functional scientific literacy” which aims at cognitive as well as moral development of students. Based on this framework a collaborative research process was centered around a local developmental issue – the transformation of a municipal kindergarten into a “social green building”: Students of the Higher College of Engineering (HTL) in the neighborhood of the kindergarten supported by their teachers, an interdisciplinary research-team (a physicist specialized in photovoltaics and environmental physics, a researcher in physics education specialized in gender and diversity issues and Nature of Science issues, a social anthropologist specialized in Education for Sustainable Development) and teacher students majoring in physics did the research work on which the suggestions for transformation were built in the context of their A-level-thesis. As finding the right answers for enhancing the comfort at the kindergarten is only possible when those stakeholders for whose use the innovations are designed – the kindergarten staff and the local municipal government – are continuously involved in the research process, the project could only be conducted successfully if “soft” social and “hard” scientific data were combined. However this regularly challenged the picture of passionate engineering. Thus the diverse and partly conflicting epistemological orientations towards STEM were a key discourse issue which not only gave rise to critical thinking about “passionate engineering” but also to discussions of further organisational development opportunities for making STEM-education in general and Higher Colleges of Engineering specifically a more welcoming field for girls. Promoted by “Sparkling Science” – a programme funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy 2014-2016.

Starting with Physics by extracting one from the surroundings
(Ekaterina Teteleva & Sergey Bogdanov, Petrozavodsk State University, Russia)

The delivering of well-established knowledge based on a strong concept framework and mathematical ‘packing’ is one of the necessary competencies of a science teacher. But often this ability per se doesn’t work properly: the beauty and strength of the well-packed knowledge are hidden for students, remaining only an archive at the best. To extract this archive is the next and much more challenging task for the teacher. This challenge is especially pronounced when you deal with “Introductory physics” for first-year students: they are yet interested in Physics, but not quite ready to find out Physics in the numerous phenomena of everyday life, nature, technology. In this connection we tried to work out this course by stressing Physics wide-spread, by taking into account social-science and cultural-science interplay. Some routine ordinary objects and phenomena were presented as interesting objects for studying and research. We also tried to achieve the best interplay between content and context, dealing with outdoor activity. The students were inspired by working in natural laboratory, extracting the latitude by shadow measurements or calculating Earth radius by observing coastal line. Cultural traditions, social phenomena were also in the focus. As the practice has shown, this way of students training contribute to their motivation, creativity and deeper understanding of physics.


Session 2

Focus of socio-scientific issues in science teachers’ professional competence development in Sweden
(Oleg Popov, Christina Ottander & Katarina Ottander, Umeå University, Sweden)

The Swedish National Agency for Education is currently implementing a project aiming to raise the didactical competence of science teachers at all school levels. The project uses a praxis-based collegial learning approach supported by facilitators and framed by the project web portal presenting study modules. The authors of this paper have been in charge of the material development for the module “teaching science through socio-scientific issues”. The material developers’ work was enriched and supported by the experience of EU funded project Promoting Attainment of Responsible Research and Innovation in Science Education. The aim of this paper is to highlight a question: what lessons could be learned from the process of material production for the professional development of science teachers in Sweden?

Developing inquiry-based and multidisciplinary approach in a teacher professional development project
(Anttoni Kervinen, University of Helsinki, Finland)

The research and development project carried out in the Department of Teacher Education in Helsinki University aims to promote primary and secondary teacher students’ and in-service teachers’ abilities to develop multidisciplinary and inquiry-based science and mathematics teaching in primary and lower secondary schools. In the designed teacher professional development model teacher students, in-service teachers and university teacher educators form teams that work collaboratively and share their expertise. The goals of the project are to produce new approaches and instructional materials for inquiry-based and integrative science teaching, put them into practice, and study the process in the context of shared activities of the participants. Research and development of inquiry-based and multidisciplinary approaches in science education are important, because these approaches are emphasized in the new Finnish core curriculum for basic education. The pilot project started in 2014 and by the end of 2015 three iterations of the project has been carried out in all together seven primary schools and in one secondary school. The phases of the project iteration are planning of the instruction, implementation at schools, and evaluation and reflection in the end of the project. During the first three pilot rounds, the themes were mostly built around biological phenomena. Interviews, questionnaires and video recordings were used as research data and analysed qualitatively. The preliminary analysis of the data indicated that both teachers and teacher students regarded collaboration in planning and teaching important. They emphasized the significance of mixed groups of students, teachers, and teacher educators. The participants felt that there was not always enough time for proper introduction, engagement and collective evaluation with the pupils. Despite the teachers and teacher students found that their skills in using student-centred and hands-on activities increased, the actual inquiry practices were often more teacher than student-centred. When multidisciplinary approach was used in teaching, the participants still had difficulties to specify the level of integration. The results indicate that the designed model of collaboration in mixed teams and sharing activities seems to be useful in promoting inquiry-based approach, multidisciplinary integration and team teaching. The results also indicate that these competencies, largely required by the renewed curriculum, are challenging for the teachers. In order to promote the project’s goals, it is important to further promote co-operation and shared expertise within the team. Also, parsing of theoretical concepts more by teacher educators during the planning process may help participants to focus on key issues of inquiry-based and multidisciplinary approach.

Key words: science education, teacher professional development, teacher education, interdisciplinary science education, inquiry-based approach, team teaching


Session 3

STEM camp – Coping with the challenges of science education in the 21st century
(Ruetai Chongsrid, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Thailand)

In Thailand, there are several policy developments on STEM education in school and workforce. National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) is one of the main organizations that contributes to STEM education. NSTDA was established under the Ministry of Science and Technology with the roles of planning and administrating four mandated missions; research and development, technology transfer, human resources development and infrastructure development. The STEM approach of NSTDA is the application of NSTDA’s researches into STEM hands-on activities and performed with science camp program for teachers and students. NSTDA’s STEM camps aim to improve teachers and students’ ability to use a problem-based approach. The quality of NSTDA’s STEM camp program was investigated through surveys, qualitative interviews and focus groups, teacher understanding and perceptions of problem-based learning as an approach to STEM education as well as their perceptions of the implementing such an approach in their professional practice. This investigation can reflect how NSTDA’s professional development program can support teachers’ ability to use an interdisciplinary problem-based STEM approach in their schools and classrooms. The concepts of designing camp are hands-on activities, fun and challenge, integrated knowledge and suitability for their local societies, age and basic knowledge. More than 100 activities in STEM camps are designed to develop skills for the 21st century and interdisciplinary concepts such as Photosynthesis camp, Luminescence camp, Forensics camp, Robotics and automation camp. From the assessment of STEM camps, the activities can motivate students to love and have fun with science and technology and have increase their competency in STEM as can be seen from the large number of science projects or inventions created from the camps.

Teaching Argumentation with Using Facebook Groups
(Ibrahim Delen, Uşak University, Turkey)

Today, argumentation in science education is widely emphasized in the policy documents in Europe, and the US as an important component of STEM education. In connection with these documents, new Turkish science curriculum also puts emphasis on this practice. But, very few studies have focused on pre-service teachers’ use of or struggles with argumentation. The aim of this study is to find out how using Facebook as a discussion tool can support this process. To further our understanding in this area, a group of elementary teacher candidates (N=58) in a Turkish public university took a course that supported online discussions focusing on learning to design activities to support argumentation. Prior to the course, none of teacher candidates could design an activity that implements argumentation. During the course, 12 groups made presentations and other groups critiqued these presentations in online discussions. In addition to peer critiques, the instructor also discussed which groups were performing better by discussing good and bad examples in the group page. The findings suggest that as a result of the Facebook discussions, the level of critique in student responses began to include more details about argumentation when the instructor started adding comments. This positive change in online discussions supported almost all students successfully designing activities implementing argumentation.


Session 4

Engineering Design Centered STEM Activities: The Participants’ Views
(Faik Özgür Karataş & Miraç Aydin, Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey)

STEM education is considered as one of the main aim of recent reform documents released in the US and the EU. Teaching STEM has been evolved for the last two decades, but is still confusing. One of the approaches in STEM education is integrating all subjects into a context. Engineering design is placed heart of this approach especially as engineering design relies on science and mathematics and flares up generating new and innovative technologies. However, engineering design is not middle school science teachers’ strong point. Thus, more programs would be carried out to promote engineering design and STEM education skills for both pre-service and in-service teachers. In this study, pre-service science teachers’ views about engineering designed centered STEM education were sought after two days of intense training. The study was conducted with 40 pre-service science teachers who enrolled in a week long intense program aimed to improve pre-service science teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) including STEM, project based learning, technology embedded inquiry and so on. STEM education took two days and twelve hours including theoretical presentation, team building activity and three engineering design activities. The participants of the program volunteered from ten different universities all over the country. Two months after they finished the program, an online form consisted of nine open-ended questions were asked to be filled out in order to grasp their views regarding the STEM education activities. The participants’ responses were analyzed by utilizing qualitative data analysis software. The main themes emerged from the analysis are STEM education is valuable; it is applicable to science education; more time and experience is needed to excel in engineering design and STEM education.

What is really STEM? Teachers’ perspectives: A case from Turkey
(Ümran Betül Cebesoy & Meltem Kurtolu Erden, Uşak University, Turkey)

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Education has become a necessity for science and technology driven world. The overarching goal of STEM education is not only to prepare students for STEM-related fields but also prepare them as active citizens that will face the challenges of technology- and science-driven society. Merge of different disciplines including science, mathematics and technology has long been aimed to deepen students’ understanding by conceptualizing concepts as well as broaden students’ understanding about related concepts. Moreover, interdisciplinary activities by merging disciplines can help students to develop their interest and engagement in courses as well as increase their content knowledge. Thus, STEM and STEM education have become important notions in both preparing students for STEM-related fields and developing their conceptual understanding by utilizing existing linkages between different disciplines. STEM approach is relatively newly approach in around the world, Ministry of National Education (MoNE) in Turkey has disseminated a curriculum change in both middle grade (fourth to eight grade) science and mathematics curriculum, and the emphasis on integration of science and mathematics has been encouraged. There are some studies that reported some specific STEM activities developed students’ computer and technology skills and knowledge, and their science process skills, as well as positively impacted positive attitudes towards science. The conducted studies in Turkish context mainly focused on pre-service teachers or middle school students. On the other hand, Turkish teachers’ capabilities of addressing STEM issues in their classes have been more prominent. Three major institutional organizations as the universities, Council of Higher Education (CoHE), and MoNE are responsible for education and employment status of STEM teachers. However, lack of coordination between these institutions have been reported as limiting factor for success of STEM education. Even STEM education has promises for Turkish education system, the success of STEM education is also related with teachers’ own knowledge, skills, attitude and teaching strategies other than their own professional area of teaching. Thus, it is important to determine teachers’ opinions about STEM Education. To date, there is limited study that investigated teachers’ opinions about STEM education and the applicability of STEM in Turkish education context. Thus, this research is aimed to investigate teachers’ opinions about STEM and applicability of STEM in Turkish Education system. For this purpose, qualitative research method is used. Study group consists of 10 teachers who is graduated from educational faculty. Maximumvariability sampling, which is one of purposeful sampling methods, was used in determining the study group.Data collected by semi structured form which developed by the researchers. The results indicated that even teachers’ acknowledged the importance of STEM education, they did not explicitly emphasize the integration of disciplines in their courses.


Session 5

Thai High School Teachers’ Preparedness and Perceptions about STEM Education
(Skonchai Chanunan, Naresuan University, Thailand)

The notion of STEM education has gained attentions from teachers and educators across the World. This seems to be promising for reforming science and mathematics education and any other related fields. In so doing, a very early step of doing so should be focused on teachers’ preparedness. As thus, the studies about teachers’ readiness, understandings, perceptions, etc. about STEM teaching and learning, are required. The purposes of the research study were to examine Thai high school teachers’ understandings and perceptions on STEM education. In the study, to develop high school teachers’ understandings on STEM teaching and learning, the two day workshop was set and run with 36 high school teachers teaching science, mathematics, technology or computer in the educational area 1 of Phitsanulok province, Thailand. For the workshop, the teachers were given lectures on meanings, backgrounds and importance of STEM education, the examples of STEM teaching and learning activities, STEM lesson design activities, small group and class discussion, and panel reflection on STEM lesson design. To examine the teachers’ understandings on STEM teaching and learning, the use of writing test, administered after the workshop, and unstructured interview with six selected participating teachers were employed. The obtained data were analysed using content analysis technique. As a result, it was found that the teachers have 78 %, on average, on understandings about STEM teaching and learning, range of 63-85 %. From the writing reflection on the test about their perception, coupled with the obtained data from the unstructured interview, it was found that the teachers worry about the assessment system which still focus on testing students’ memory, time constraints (too much content but less time for teaching), too much teachers’ other work which are not related to teaching and learning, according to Thai educational system. These can block teachers from teaching STEM lessons. However, the teachers were interested in knowing more about how to plan STEM lessons and use them with their students.

Applications of STEM projects in classroom
(Diler Dilaver Türe, Murat Alkın, Neriman Tekeli Hayıroğlu & Tuğba Demir, Yenidoğu Education, Turkey)

STEM is the new area for all educators, teachers and students. We can see lots of different videos, posters, news or advertisement about stem education. Science, technology, engineering and math will be able to prepare better future for everybody and solve wide variety of problems when come together. In today’s world we need innovative ideas for the future and stem education would be the hope for everybody. However applications of STEM in classroom seems to be a big handicap especially about time management, cost and effectiveness. In this presentation we want to show three projects which include solutions for elevator accidents, effects of sound waves on the boiling point of water and making hardboard with gourd. These three projects are found and applied by our students. We try to present possibility of effective STEM education in classroom without common expensive tools.


Session 6

Forming Cognitive-nets & Social-nets can inspire creativity with the power of Cognitive Diversity
(Altaf Qadeer, A Teacher & Researcher, Toronto, Canada)

Students enjoy the cognitive journey of innovation with the world of making nets of ideas, nets of subjects and nets of inventions! How? The new research in neurology & cognitive science to enrich the field of education – powerful pathways possible! How can we inspire our creativity to reach the new heights of innovation! Cognitive Diversity, STEM, and other transdisciplinary themes will be highlighted; linking theory, research and practice. We will discuss current international approaches and innovative ways aimed at creating and fostering links of various subjects. The integration of frames of mind to develop innovative pathways (i.e. Cognitive-net) will be discussed. Motivating colleagues and students by sharing the progress of ideas, new resources, and innovative pathways emerging at various levels. Resources for practical use will also be shared.

The presentation slides »

The Encouragement of 21st Century Skills by Integrated STEM Activities on General Science 5 CourseCANCELLED
(Seksan Sansorrapisut, The Upper Northern STEM Education Center, Yupparaj Wittayalai School, Thailand)


Session 7

Surveys of Quebec Childrens’ Conceptions of Force, Gravity and Motion
(Abdeljalil Métioui, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada & Louis Trudel, University of Ottawa, Canada)

The works of numerous researchers demonstrate that among the pupils of the elementary school, their conceptions of the light, magnetism, electrical current and force concepts are naïve. The present communication is related to this problem and aims to uncover the understandings of 58 pupils from Quebec (Canada), aged 10-12 years, concerning force, motion and gravitation concepts. To identify their conceptions, we proceeded with classical methods such as the paper-pencil questionnaire. Noted that the questions asked (n = 6) take account of researches done worldwide in elementary schools. We also took into account the notions prescribed in the academic program of the ministry of the education of Quebec. As an illustration, we present four of the retained questions and their analysis. For example, the first question is related to the Newton’s third law of motion: “Someone tries to move his car (engine is not working), but unfortunately, the car is not moving. According to you, is there a force on the car? Explain your answer”. With this question, we wanted to know if pupils would explain the situation when one is not able to move an object, by relating it to the presence of another force equal and opposite to the muscular force applied. 7% of the pupils affirmed the presence of a force that opposes to the one employed by the person. In the same way, 36% of the children confirmed that no force applies since the car doesn’t move. The second question had for object the relation they establish between force and speed. Therefore, they had to indicate, while justifying their answer, if when one applies a constant force to an object, it will move at a steady speed. 52% of the children replied in the affirmative. Let’s note this topic is about a conception similar to the one developed by Aristotle that ignored the notion of acceleration. The third question requests pupils to explain the motion of a bullet that continues to move after a golfer threw it. 28% of the children affirm that it continues its motion with the force that has been applying by the golfer because the movement requires the application of a continuous force. It is about a conception that is like the one developed by Buridan (1300-1358) stating that the motion requires the applied with a constant force. Let’s note that few of them affirmed that in addition to the golfer’s force, there is the presence of other forces such as gravitation. The fourth question aimed to know if, for them, the gravity applies to the object on the Moon as on the Earth: “According to you, do astronauts have the same mass on the Moon that on the Earth? Explain your answer”. For 86% of the pupils, the astronauts don’t have the same mass because on the Moon there is no gravitation. In conclusion, we identified four erroneous conceptions: (1) the motion requires the continuous application of force, (2) a force produces motion, (3) in the absence of a force the objects are at rest; and (4) the notions of mass and weight are synonymous. These conceptions and those developed during history are interesting to create many constructivist environments for teaching.

Promoting understanding of the concept of relative speed using a computer assisted laboratory
(Louis Trudel, University of Ottawa, Canada & Abdeljalil Métioui, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)

Among the physical phenomena studied in high school, understanding of kinematics concepts is important because they are a prerequisite to the learning of subsequent concepts of mechanics. In this regard, our research aimed to study the effect of a computer-assisted laboratory on understanding of the relative speed among high school students. Our sample consisted of two classes of 21 and 24 French-speaking pupils respectively, attending a physics course in a high school of the province of Ontario in Canada. These two classrooms were following an optional introductory course in physics at the 11th grade. To study the learning process of the students, we analyzed with qualitative methods the content of the activity guide students had to fill. Our results indicate that, following the implementation of this strategy, only a fraction of students had changed their views on relative speed. In conclusion, we draw the benefits and limitations of the study and provide future research directions for the design of computer assisted laboratory in physics.


Session 8

Exploring Design-Based Science as a STEM Approach for Understanding Force and Energy Topic
(Miraç Aydin & Faik Özgür Karataş, Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey)

Main goals of the countries are to grow up STEM-literate generations for an innovation-driven economic world. They try to employ STEM-centered curricula into educational system for students to gain the 21th century skills. One of the approaches to integrate STEM into middle school curricula is Design-Based Science (DBS) which enables construction of scientific knowledge around concrete design activities. The goal of this study is to explore middle school students’ understanding of force and energy topic as they engaged in an STEM program in which they constructed clockwork toy vehicles as teams. The activity is based on DBS which includes five steps namely; contextualization, searching and gathering relevant information, generating solutions to the design problem and presenting it to their group, constructing vehicles as an artifact, and testing vehicles. A total of nine seventh grade students divided into three teams participated in this study. Focus group interviews were used to identify the participants’ conceptions of force and energy topic with each team before and after the STEM program. The participants’ responses were analyzed inductively to compare their understandings. The results demonstrated that DBS model as an STEM approach help students understand force and energy topic.

Factors of students’ effectiveness in solving chemistry tasks based upon sub-micro representations
(Vesna Ferk Savec, Špela Svetičič, Miha Slapničar & Iztok Devetak, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia)

Understanding of the chemical phenomena by students depends to the great extend upon their adequate mental model of science concepts on the macro, sub-micro and symbolic level. Students’ use of sub-micro representations, when explaining chemical concepts, also reveals many of their possible misunderstandings on the particulate level. The purpose of the presented study is to examine students’ cognitive processes and factors that influence students’ effectiveness in solving chemistry tasks based on sub-micro representations (derived from assessments such as TIMSS, PISA, NPZ) by the use of Eye tracking and retrospective think aloud method. The factors, whose role is to be examined, were the following: different types of sub-micro representations used in tasks, complexity of the task, role of the legend explaining particles nature. For the purpose of the investigation 30 students were selected via stratified random selection principle from the pool of 150 non-chemistry freshmen students based on their achievement on the chemistry knowledge test. In the investigation procedure the participants completed tasks at the sub-microscopic level, which were displayed on the computer screen. Eye tracking (X2-30 with Tobii Studio Enterprise) and retrospective think aloud were used for monitoring students’ cognitive processes when solving sub-micro chemistry tasks. The data gathered from eye movements in the information processing during task solving indicates the existence of significant correlations between the processes of cognition and eye movements towards specific areas in sub-micro representations, and in such a way points out to the role of the examined factors in solving chemistry task. The ideas for implication and further studies of the use of sub-micro representations in teaching and learning of chemistry can be derived based on the results.


Session 9

CREATIONS – Developing an Engaging Science Classroom
(Franz X. Bogner, University of Bayreuth, Germany)

The CREATIONS scheme, a European project with 16 Partners, involves science teachers and classroom students in inquiry-based initiatives by linking schools and research infrastructures in order to spark young people’s interest in science and in following scientific careers. It centers upon effective community-building between researchers, teachers and students and empowering the latter to use, share and exploit the collective power of unique scientific resources (research facilities, scientific instruments, advanced ICT tools, simulation and visualization applications and scientific databases). Consequently, the strengths of formal schemes (educational field trips, virtual visits, school based masterclasses) and informal (games and student generated apps, hangouts, related artworks like science theatre or student generated exhibits, junior science cafes) are harvested to promote creative inquiry-based learning and appreciate science works. An effective integration of science education with infrastructures supports monitored-for-impact innovative activities in supporting feedback for the take-up of such interventions at large scale. A roadmap assures guidelines for implementation of innovative educational and outreach activities that could act as a reference in both, scientific research outreach and science education.

Context-based outreach to schools increases motivation and learning in chemistry
(Saara Kaski, University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

Department of Chemistry at the University of Jyväskylä has taken an active role in promoting university studies for the youth. The aim is to engage, motivate and attract talented new students, as well as to offer a fast track into the university studies. The outreach has involved hands-on laboratory work, scientific visits, expert visits to schools, and lately virtual courses based on university level chemistry courses. For over a decade there has been an on-site laboratory course for the students from general upper secondary schools. This course is held on Saturdays and it is approximately 27 hours of work. In addition to university level lab experiments, the students are introduced to the current research at the department. The course is intended to support experimental working skills in chemistry laboratory. It has also turned out to be valuable for students and schools wanting to extend their inquiry-based chemistry education, as the course build a bridge between upper secondary school and university chemistry experiments. Recently, context and inquiry-based active learning has been adopted in the department’s bachelor degree teaching. At the same time, a virtual course “Chemistry of living environment” has been constructed based on a first year course at the University. The content is kept at the level of basic chemistry course i.e. all students from general upper secondary schools can attend. The main topics at the web course (food, medicine, air, energy and household chemicals) are familiar from students’ everyday life. The learning material of the course is partly self-generated and partly given as links from the open web materials. The course is open for all students and it has already been adopted in Central Finland as an additional course offered in upper secondary schools. Currently, another e-learning course on “Biological Chemistry” is under development and the premiere for the general upper secondary school students will be in autumn 2016. This course will consist of both theory and guided laboratory experiments to be accomplished at home. The course is intended to show the connection between biology and chemistry, and provide an interdisciplinary approach to scientific questions and phenomena, in accord to the new national curriculum starting in schools in autumn 2016. Students can take real advantage of these courses, as they are compensated as a part of the compulsory university level studies during the first year at University of Jyväskylä. This supports the early interest in chemistry topics, increase the engagement of the students and positively influence both the later learning and the path to the working life. Also, it benefits the Department of Chemistry since students continuing their studies at the university appear to be motivated and have a crystallized view of deeper learning in chemistry.


Session 10

Peer review and its use in a university course
(Sini Karppinen & Jokke Häsä, University of Helsinki, Finland)

Peer review is a teaching method in student-centred learning. In peer review students evaluate and give feedback of other students written assignments with the help of guidelines and questions given by the teacher. Studies show that peer review activates the student to critically evaluate also his or her own work. This is why peer review teaches not only skills in giving and receiving feedback, but also self-evaluation. Thus it supports both immediate learning and the development of general study skills. We have used peer review in the process of writing assignments in the course Scientific communication for mathematicians. One of the aims of the course is to develop communication skills and to teach students to produce mathematical text. We will present our experiences in the use of peer review.

New Opportunities for Phenomenon-based Mathematics Learning in the STEAM ApproachCANCELLED
(Kristof Fenyvesi, University of Jyväskylä, Finland)


Session 11

Popularising mathematics with dialogue teaching and peer instructors
(Juulia Lahdenperä & Rami Luisto, University of Helsinki, Finland)

Teaching assistant positions are highly popular among students in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki. Every year there are more applicants than positions available. To tackle this problem, a new course “Student-centered guidance” was established in autumn of 2015. The course was targeted for 2nd year mathematics students and its main objectives were to offer teaching experience and to enhance the department’s teaching assistant education. The student teaching assistants served as group session instructors for another new course “Mathematics for everyone”. This course was targeted mainly for students studying mathematics as their minor subject, and the goal was to offer new perspectives on what mathematics is, how mathematicians talk, what kinds of problems mathematicians engage with and how mathematicians approach problems. The course was implemented by using dialogue teaching method. The student teaching assistants attended weekly meetings where mathematical and pedagogical content of the “Mathematics for everyone” -course was discussed. In addition, the student teaching assistants reflected Extreme Apprenticeship guiding principles upon one-to-one instruction situations exposed at the group sessions, and read two articles on modern pedagogical frameworks. “Mathematics for everyone” -course was very popular. The students liked the dialogue teaching approach. In the course feedback, the students reported that their perception of mathematics has broadened and they view mathematics as more fun. The student teaching assistants attending the “Student-centered guidance” -course were very positive about their teaching experience. Overall, the combination of these two courses was highly successful.

Extreme Apprenticeship
(Johanna Rämö & Lotta Oinonen, University of Helsinki, Finland)

Extreme Apprenticeship is a student centred teaching method created in the University of Helsinki. Its theoretical background is in Cognitive Apprenticeship. The core idea of Extreme Apprenticeship is to support students in becoming experts in their field by having them participate in activities that resemble those carried out by professionals. Students learn skills and gain knowledge by working on tasks that have been divided into smaller and approachable goals, which are then merged together as the students start to master a topic. Passive activities are reduced to the minimum. The main method of teaching is one-on-one instruction, and the students are encouraged to work collaboratively. Bi-directional feedback between the instructor and the student plays a crucial role: the students receive continuous feedback from their work, and at the same time the teachers receive feedback from the progress of the students, which can be used to craft materials and assignments that help students understand a topic. The Extreme Apprenticeship method has been used in teaching both university and high school students. The results have been good: students are more engaged than in traditional courses, and it has been possible to shift the focus from rote learning to gaining more conceptual understanding. In this presentation, we describe how the Extreme Apprenticeship method has been used in teaching mathematics and what kinds of results have been obtained.


Session 12

Modern Biology outreach experiments
(Nastassia Racenet, Chantal Wicky & ​Marie-Pierre Chevron, University of Fribourg, Switzerland)

Topics related to genetics, epigenetics, animal testing are highly debated in society. To allow school teachers to tackle them, we developed workshops and outreach experiments that can be performed in classrooms. The proposed experiments are playful, rational, rigorous, adapted to a large public and directly linked to state-of-art research in biology. All experiments are available in a cart that can be easily moved to the classroom. This kind of mobile lab contains all the material and reagents to perform experiments linked to genetic diagnosis, criminal investigations, phylogeny studies, bacterial resistance detection and DNA amplification (PCR). Basic observations of the model organism, C. elegans, as well as behavioral tests are also proposed. In these experiments, science, technology and engineering are combined and teach together into a meaningful learning paradigm based on real-world applications consistent with STEM education. We believe that an experimental approach to address difficult scientific concepts should help construction of meaning and contribute to develop the necessary critical mind to debate scientific issues.

Is STEM possible for Turkey? What Teacher Educators Think about STEM?
(Meltem Kurtolu Erden & Ümran Betül Cebesoy, Uşak University, Turkey)

The importance of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) has been increasing day by day. The role of scientific and technological understanding in making personal decision in 21th century has become more prominent. Thus, STEM education has aimed to develop students’ decision making skills in order to prepare them their future roles in order to face the challenges that are introduced by science- and technology-driven society. This can be possible by removing the barriers between disciplines. By adjusting and removing current barriers between disciplines, STEM education has become a meta-discipline that integrates discipline with technology. STEM approach is relatively newly approach in around the world, Ministry of National Education (MoNE) in Turkey has disseminated a curriculum change in both middle grade (fourth to eight grade) science and mathematics curriculum, and the emphasis on integration of science and mathematics has been increased. Thus, there have been an increase in the number of studies that investigated the role of STEM activities on students’ either science process skills or computer and technology skills and knowledge. On the other hand, the aforementioned studies in Turkish context mainly focused on pre-service teachers or middle school students. In Turkey, three main institutional organizations as the universities, Council of Higher Education (CoHE), and MoNE are responsible for education and employment status of STEM teachers. However, lack of coordination between these there institutionshave been reported as limiting factor for success of STEM education. The teacher educators in the universities are responsible for raising pre-service STEM teachers with required content knowledge in STEM subjects as well as teaching practices of integrated subjects. To date, there is limited study that investigated teacher educators’ opinions about STEM education and the applicability of STEM in Turkish context. Thus, this research is aimed to investigate teacher educators’ opinions about STEM and applicability of STEM in Turkish Education system. For this purpose a semi-structured interviews form was developed by the researchers. Study group consist of 8 faculty members working in faculty of education.

Keywords: STEM education, teacher educators, integration


Poster presentations

Career Academy on Textile: An example of STEM curriculum in Thailand
(Pornrat Wattanakasiwich, Chiang Mai University, Thailand)

This study aimed to present a development of STEM curriculum based on a real-world context. The curriculum has been developed under a project of career academy on textile industry. This project aimed to promote and train essential skills to lower secondary school students related to textile. There are four themes in the curriculum including (1) growing mulberry trees, (2) breeding silkworm, (3) weaving and dying silk or cotton tread, and (4) designing fabric made of silk or cotton. The project has been supported by National Science and Technology and Innovation Policy Office, Chiang Mai University, Thailand and a private textile company in order to develop career-ready and science-educated workforce for a textile industry. The curriculum consists of multiple modules. Each module was designed from the understanding by design framework and presented in real-world problems/tasks of the textile industry. Firstly, science faculties observed the textile manufacturing processes and discussed essential skills with the textile experts. Secondly, the faculties developed the modules targeted on the big idea or the main skills such as how to monitor growing rate of the mulberry tree, how to measure soil quality etc. Each module is hand-on and performance-based, so students can learn related science and mathematics concepts, develop skills related to career in textile industry, and develop scientific inquiry skills. The curriculum is still in the trail phase, implementing in four secondary schools located in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The big challenges of this project as reported from teachers were time-management, instructional resources and ways to assess students’ performances and skills.

ORT Russia – from Technology for All to STEM Education
(Sergey Gorinskiy, ORT, Russia)

ORT Russia is a member of World ORT – the world’s largest Jewish non-governmental organisation specializing in technology education and vocational training. Founded in 1880 in St Petersburg, ORT nowadays operates in 59 countries and helps around 300 000 students around the world. In 1998 ORT launched the Technology for All (TfA) project in several schools in Russia and other countries of CIS and Baltic States. The project is based on Technological Literacy concept aiming to provide school students with ability to use, manage, assess and understand technology. ORT Russia became the first organization in the region which suggested a new model to teaching technology in schools. In 2014-2015 this model became the basis for the exemplary National Technology Curriculum. Nowadays in line with changes in technology, the economy, the labour market and international educational trends, ORT gradually introduce to schools new approaches aiming to change pupils’ attitudes towards technology from “users” to “creators”. To reach this aim it is important to teach and study technology and engineering in close connection with science and mathematics. However, for most schools STEM remains “terra incognita”, science and mathematics subjects are studied as theoretical disciplines which have no connection with engineering, technology or real life in general. Analysing different approaches to STEM education we consider two competing models: integrative model and model with external integrator. The first approach can include several levels of integration. Moving in direction from sequenced teaching of STEM subjects to their total integration (through parallel, partial and enhanced integration levels) requires scrupulous redesign of school curriculum and teachers retraining. The second approach doesn’t require redesign of traditional curriculum. It is based on external extra subjects (within or out of school curriculum). They are used as STEM motivators for students and catalysts for integrated learning of STEM subjects through student projects. It seems today robotics, which integrates mechanics, pneumatics, electrical engineering, electronics, IT, science and math, is the most credible candidate for this role. One of the examples of integrative robotics STEM projects used in ORT schools is the Robotraffic competitions of autonomous vehicles. These competitions are designed by Leumi Robotics Center of Technion (Israel Institute of Technology) and are now a part of Russian Robotics Olympiad. Taking into account the two above mentioned models ORT is transforming existing structure of school Technology Centres into STEM centres which operate as centres of innovation at schools.

Promoting problem-solving skills in mechanics among college physics students
(Louis Trudel, University of Ottawa, Canada & Abdeljalil Métioui, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada)

In general, the difficulties encountered by students in solving physics problems mainly concern the decisions to be made in the process as well as the initial analysis of the problem. Therefore, students need a systematic approach to problem solving. The main steps of the problem solving method proposed consists of: 1) analyzing the problem, 2) developing the solution, 3) checking out the solution. Such an approach had been used with a group of college students who had failed their first physics course in mechanics. To study the implementation of the proposed approach, the main researcher who was also the teacher kept a diary in which he recorded his observations on the course of events and critical details about the introduction of the approach. One key feature of the approach was that lectures were kept at a minimum while the emphasis was on teaching students a general method of solving problems based on the work of the mathematician George Polya. As a result, all students, except one, succeeded the course while performing in a high stake exam. We concluded by stating the limits of the research and offering suggestions to implement the method in high school and college physics courses.

Science Lesson with Animations
(Hatice Kirmaci, Korkmaz Yigit Anatolian High School, Turkey & Yasemin Kose, Ivme Schools, Ankara, Turkey)

Science course is typically a lesson that students have difficulties. Because in addition to mathematics, students are expected to develop their abilities to review and logic. Students need to do experiments and observations. Because of insufficient laboratory conditions and less time, it is extremely difficult to handle courses by observation and experiment. Thus, students have difficulty understanding the physics lesson. To solve this problem we created some animations for physics lessons which are the most challenging for students. After making animations, we choosed two classes (Class A and Class B). The subject was taught without using animations in Class A and with using animations in Class B. Although the levels of students were similar in both classes, the class in which the subjects had animations comprehended more quickly than the other class. A short quiz was applied at the same time in both classes. As expected, the class using animations did better. High school students understood the physics lesson better when animations were used. The method was experimented also in secondary school. Secondary school students were more excited than the high school students. Secondary school students saw them like a game and were much more affected than high school students. Physics or science lessons comes frightening for students, especially girls. Girls are not as interested in science than the boys. We saw that in this project, when we used animations, girls were very affected. When they “saw” an event with own eyes, they understood it more quickly. By watching the animations, students can understand the event he/she has to imagine.

The Development of Scientific and Pedagogy Competencies by Quebec Pre-service Primary Teachers
(Abdeljalil Métioui, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada & Louis Trudel, University of Ottawa, Canada)

The present qualitative study shows the results of an experiment led by 120 pre-service primary teachers from Quebec in Canada. The training which lasted four months at the rate of three hours per week took place in two phases. The first phase consisted of 4 steps to help pre-service teachers acquire knowledge competency in science and pedagogy, by the curriculum of the Ministry of the Education of the Government of Quebec. In the second phase, the pre-service teachers had to prepare two teaching sequences centered on laboratory experiments for their future learners. To achieve this goal, they had to follow an approach similar to the one experienced in the first phase. Finally, they had to complete a questionnaire to specify difficulties of a scientific or pedagogical nature which they encountered during the development of their teaching sequences. The analysis of the constructed sequences and the data of the questionnaire show a substantial effort on their part, in spite of the scientific and pedagogical difficulties they confronted.


Other presentations


Facilitating Small Group Work: Analyzing Video Cases
(Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University, USA)

In the workshop, we examine two video clips and try to understand the work of facilitating small group work.



MAT[É]-TEMA[T]
(Ann-Sofi Röj-Lindberg & Kasper Hiltunen, Åbo Akademi University, Finland)

In our presentation, we share two cases of multidisciplinary phenomenon-based projects of integrating mathematics, household sciences and sloyd. The presentation focuses on how teachers, students and teacher educators reflect on the benefits and challenges of working across these three schools subjects.



Presentation of the LUMA Centre Finland
(Maija Aksela, LUMA Centre Finland)



STEM education in Estonia – key is in the integration of systems and cooperation
(Terje Tuisk, Estonian Research Council)

There is a strong need for more Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) graduates in Europe to ensure smart, sustainable and inclusive economic growth and quality jobs for young people. This need was already identified as a target in the Lisbon Strategy and confirmed in countless reports, studies and policy initiatives by the European Commission, CEDEFOP as well as individual member states. Various parties have drawn attention to the low popularity of STEM specialties in the past and a lot has been done to improve the situation – the founding of different Science Centers, the development of teaching materials and efforts to popularize STEM specialties and science in schools and the media.

Estonia has new State Curriculum that supports both STEM initiatives and new approaches in Teaching Methods, but still it seems that the efforts made in the system of General Education alone are not enough to make decisive changes happen: to rise the interest of young people in STEM in general and particularly in choosing STEM for higher education and choosing STEM as their future career path. The activities of all involved and interested parties have to be made to function more effectively and in cooperation in the name of this common goal.

In our presentation we will elaborate the systematic efforts made in Estonia to engage wider range of stakeholders in order to support STEM teachers at general education – possibilities to integrate into STEM teaching activities initiated by higher and vocational education establishments as well as extra-curricular activities at school and outside in cooperation with industry and local governments. How to involve into the system interests of different areas of life (culture, agriculture, economic affairs etc.). We will describe activities initiated at different levels – from nationwide to local cases, from policy driven to non-profit.



The Research Interests of Professor Chris Rasmussen
(Chris Rasmussen, San Diego State University, USA, & Anna-Maija Partanen, University of Lapland, Finland)

The workshop consists of informal discussions with Chris Rasmussen about his research. He has especially focused on the teaching and learning of undergraduate mathematics, with an emphasis on courses that typically function as a transition to advanced mathematics. His work explores how pedagogical approaches and instructional design principles that have been successful at promoting student learning in earlier grade levels can be adapted to the university setting. Central to this work is careful attention to student thinking and a systematic, theory-driven study of the social interactions in which meanings are established, where norms for convincing arguments and presentations are negotiated, and where students can connect more formal mathematical developments to their personal experience.


Workgroups and other sessions in Finnish (or Swedish) language

These workshops / other sessions are organised in Finnish (or Swedish), but the topics (and descriptions) of them are provided here in English for your reference.



Are all the snowflakes similar?
(Anna-Maija Partanen, University of Lapland)

A learning path from the science center Arktikum leads students to the fascinating world of snow, especially that of snowflakes, by a story of the “snowflake” Bentley and different interactive and investigative activities. The learning path includes studying and comparing snowflakes, observing their symmetry, classifying snowflakes and solving a snowflake code. In the workshop we learn about the learning path, and actually do some of the activities. The learning path is designed by Jonna Katajamäki.



BOF: Programming and computational thinking resource networks and learning communities
(Lea Kutvonen, University of Helsinki)

BOF (Birds of a feather) is a method of meeting around a shared interest and effectively share and collect otherwise non-visible knowledge. You may register beforehand to present (1-2 mins) a resource, a centre or an environment, bring a poster, or join in for discussion. A shared resource map is gathered and published from the conference and BOF for the continuos use by teachers.



Co4Lab – Get inspired and innovate!
(Kati Sormunen, Innokas network)



Context-based inquiry in chemistry teaching
(Jaana Herranen & students, University of Helsinki)

Chemistry teacher students’ projects, inquiry teaching sequences, will be presented in the workshop. Projects are developed during inquiry-based chemistry teaching II course in the University of Helsinki, and created around contexts chosen by the students. Projects are planned in line with the new national curriculum. Assessment of the developed inquiry teaching sequence will also be presented during the workshop.



Dramatic Science
(Jaakko Turkka, University of Helsinki)

The workshop explores science education based on methods that are inspired by drama education that can be used to foster students’ engagement and cooperation. We’ll do exercises that include movement and improvisation followed with a discussion.



Ecovan – a classroom outdoors
(Aulikki Laine, The Finnish Association of Nature and Environment Schools)

Schools in Finland will start working according to the new National Core Curricula in the autumn of 2016. In the new curricula memorable , experiential and phenomenon based learning has a very important role in teaching . One way to expand teaching to experiental learning and outdoor teaching is Ecovan. There are all the equipment in the Ecovan that you need for teaching outdoors. There are also teaching programs that are planned for primary schools. You can see Ecovan and it’s possibilities for teaching, when You participate in Ecovan, a classroom outdoors workshopp. For more information, see www.ekopaku.fi. Workshop is organised on the yard of the FellmanniCampus.



Educational games for chemistry education
(Maiju Tuomisto, University of Helsinki)

In the workshop, both criteria for a quality educational game are exposed and different types of educational games available for chemistry education are explored.



Encouraging assessment in mathematics, science and technology education
(Maija Aksela, Jaana Herranen & Maiju Tuomisto, University of Helsinki)

Workshop concentrates on assessment methods, especially encouraging, formative assessment. There will be discussion on how to best support students` learning by assessment. Also concrete assessment methods already used are presented. Teachers wanting to develop assessment further are especially hoped to join the workshop.



Evaluating programming skills
(Lea Kutvonen, University of Helsinki)

Teachers face new challenges in grading students’ programming projects. The gradually evolving nature of software production requires continuos, formative evaluation. I addition, it is restriced by differences in maturity of children in managing key software concepts.



Experiments in upper secondary school physics I
(Ari Hämäläinen & Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)

Requirements set by the new national core curriculum and digital matriculation exam. Crucial experiments of course FY1 (Physics as a natural science).



Experiments in upper secondary school physics II
(Ari Hämäläinen & Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)

Crucial experiments of courses FY2 (Heat) and FY3 (Electricity).



Experiments in upper secondary school physics III
(Ari Hämäläinen & Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)

Crucial experiments of courses FY4 (Force and motion) and FY5 (Oscillatory motion and waves).



Experiments in upper secondary school physics IV
(Ari Hämäläinen & Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)

Crucial experiments of courses FY6 (Electromagnetism) and FY7 (Matter and radion).



Geomedia & everyday life experiences of the young
(Rami Ratvio, University of Helsinki, & Sanna Mäki, University of Turku)

The workshop brings out two new concepts of the new geography curriculum, the geomedia and the everyday life experiences of the young as part of learning geography.



Geopiste and PaikkaOppi – common resources for geography teaching and learning & geography learning environments
(Rami Ratvio & Markus Jylhä, University of Helsinki, & Virpi Hirvensalo, University of Turku)

In this workshop we get familiar with the teaching and learning resources provided by Geopiste and PaikkaOppi and learn about e-learning environments in geography.



How to organize a programming MOOC at upper secondary school?
(Anni Järvenpää, University of Helsinki)



IBM Watson
(IBM Finland)



ICT in upper secondary physics education
(Riitta Salmenoja, Loimaa municipality)

What do the new curriculum and electronic matriculation examination demand from ICT in education? Practical examples from actual physics courses.



ICT within the experimental work in chemistry education
(Veli-Matti Ikävalko, University of Helsinki)



Individualized learning model in biology teaching
(Markus Mäenpää, University of Oulu)

New curriculums highlight constructivism and 21st century skills. How should the school react and how should they meet the developmental challenges? Part of the solution could be the individualized learning model proposed by math teacher Pekka Peura. In this workshop Markus Mäenpää presents his master’s thesis about use of individualized learning model in teaching and learning of biology in comprehensive school and high school. There will be plenty of time to questions and conversation.



Inquiry-based activites for biology education
(Justus Mutanen, University of Helsinki)

In this workshop, participants can explore school science inquiries for secondary and high school students. As an example, the participants will do a small school inquiry about the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. In addition, the participants are involved in developing school science inquiries of their own.



Inspiring programming with small steps for the grades 7–9
(Jarmo Hurri, Helsingin suomalainen yhteiskoulu)



Interested in coding and robotics??
(Erkki Hautala & Piia Pelander, Innokas network)



Learners with special needs in chemistry education
(Päivi Kousa & students, University of Helsinki)



Learning on plant genetic resources – introduce yourself to the biodiversity of food plants
(Merja Hartikainen & Teija Tenhola-Roininen, Natural Resources Institute Finland)

What does the biodiversity of food plants mean? Virtual and freely available learning material done in the Geenivaraoppi project will be presented. In the workshop, participants will see different ways how pupils can observe genetic resources and introduce themselves in food plant biodiversity. This theme is very suitable on phenomenon-based learning (biology, geography, home economics, art and chemistry).



Looking for physics and chemistry phenomena in nature
(Pirkko Kärnä)

According to the new curriculum physics and chemistry teaching is based on the phenomenon in all grades. In the working group we are considering these approaches, and we will do practical exercises in order to get material for teaching.



LUMA SUOMI: Act and Calculate
(Päivi Porras, Saimaa University of Applied Sciences)

Learning entities for studying mathematics without text-books in primary school is presented.



LUMA SUOMI: Activities as basis of the concepts’ teaching and learning in mathematics
(Jani Turunen, City of Kuopio)



LUMA SUOMI: Arduino Programming
(Kyösti Blinnikka, Olari high school, City of Espoo)

Arduino platform is very popular environment to practice modern technology. It is possible to create all kinds of projects at different levels of the new technology and programming. Arduino environment suits everybody from basic education to universities. In this workshop we will learn to make and program an temperature alarm. More experienced teachers will get hints and material for further teaching of Arduino.



LUMA SUOMI: Business cooperation at the course Mathematics and science in society
(Päivi Kousa & students, University of Helsinki, & Anni Siltanen, The Chemical Industry Federation of Finland)



LUMA SUOMI: Cross curricular teaching of science at primary school
(Mikko Kesonen, University of Eastern Finland)

This workshop covers the cross curricular teaching of science that focuses on a human’s physical properties, such as grip strength. The school activities presented in the workshop are designed for primary school level but they can be adapted to higher levels such as upper comprehensive school.

In the workshop, tools for designing and implementing the cross curricular teaching of science are presented. In addition, the use of these tools is demonstrated in the context of a Finnish LUMA-project that aims at promoting the cross curricular teaching of science at the primary school level. Participants may try some of the tasks and activities created in the project, and in order to do so, they should have a device that has the Internet access.



LUMA SUOMI: DigiSmart
(Linda Mannila, Åbo Akademi University)

The aim of the project is to raise interest in and awareness for safety and integrity questions in the digital world. In addition to creating suitable text material for grades 7-9, we also develop and pilot hands-on workshop material, where students get to discuss and share experiences about different topics related to this area. Bring your own device!



LUMA SUOMI: Emphasizing argumentation in physics teaching
(Mikko Kesonen, University of Eastern Finland)

This workshop covers how to emphasize argumentation in physics teaching at the upper comprehensive level. The played by argumentation in science and science education is briefly presented. In addition, some tools are given for taking students argumentation skills into account in a physics class. Participants may test these tools and discuss their suitability.



LUMA SUOMI: Everyday life phenomenon – Interdisciplinary teaching in the context of food
(Outi Haatainen, University of Helsinki)

Together with teachers we have developed pedagogical models for interdisciplinary teaching in the context of food. Some of these models are presented in this session as well as the experiences of the teachers developing and testing the models.



LUMA SUOMI: Explore and wonder: pre-school children’s learning of science process skills
(Jenni Vartiainen, University of Helsinki)

Workshop presents hands-on activities that were developed during the project that aimed to support pre-school level science education and children’s learning of science process skills by developing new playful learning environments and science activities.



LUMA SUOMI: Flexible equation solving
(Riikka Palkki, University of Oulu)

Flexible equation solving is a new, inspiring approach to linear equation solving. The approach emphasizes conceptual understanding. Transformations needed in equation solving are introduced as a cluster instead of one by one which is traditionally done in Finnish school books. During 10 lessons, small group work is used a lot and whole-class discussions are used to understand new concepts and focal ideas of the lessons. Pupils describe their own thinking, listen and comment their peers’ ideas, use and compare multiple solutions and create, solve and analyze equations to achieve better understanding, motivation and flexibility. More information (in Finnish).



LUMA SUOMI: Fluency and flexibility to the basic numeracy!
(Maarit Laitinen, City of Tampere)



LUMA SUOMI: From education to the school, part A: Step by Step towards Inquiry
(Anna Uitto & Anttoni Kervinen, University of Helsinki; Aulikki Laine, Lahti University Campus; Lassi Pyykkö & Anniina Koliseva, University of Jyväskylä; Pentti Impiö & Tiina Yli-Kero, Kokkola University Centre Chydenius & Sari Havu-Nuutinen, University of Eastern Finland)



LUMA SUOMI: From education to the school, part B: Using teamteaching as a resource for inquiry
(Sari Havu-Nuutinen, University of Eastern Finland; Anttoni Kervinen & Anna Uitto, University of Helsinki; Aulikki Laine, Lahti University Campus; Lassi Pyykkö & Anniina Koliseva, University of Jyväskylä)



LUMA SUOMI: From the forest to the microscope!
(Helen Cooper, Åbo Akademi University)

We look for ways to encourage organising lessons in biology and environmental studies outdoors for 7 to 12 year-olds. In our pilot project we have been testing the use of mobile microscopes in exploring insects and plants with pupils and their teachers. We are also surveying how prepared teachers’ are to take their pupils outdoors and provide discovery based learning experiences. The information gained in the project will be used in preparing supporting material.



LUMA SUOMI: Game design and programming
(Jussi Kasurinen, Lappeenranta University of Technology)



LUMA SUOMI: How to integrate engineering and physics
(Jesse Hietala, University of Eastern Finland)

How to integrate engineering design process into physics classroom, and how does that foster learning? A short introduction to the theory and after that some hands-on experiments.



LUMA SUOMI: Integrative Science Education
(Anu Hartikainen-Ahia, Sirpa Kärkkäinen & Kari Sormunen, University of Eastern Finland)

Come see how integrative science education is implemented in practice and familiarize yourself with newly developed teaching materials. At the same time, you will also hear teachers’, pre-service teachers’ and teacher educators’ experiences of jointly implemented study modules.



LUMA SUOMI: Lego Mindstorms EV3 Programming
(Jouni Könönen, Saimaa University of Applied Sciences)

This session introduces Lego Mindstorms EV3 graphical programming environment and its extents (C#, Java, Python). There are also informed some aspects of assembling Lego robotics for groups of students, as they are affecting programming.



LUMA SUOMI: Meaningful Mathematics
(Jenni Räsänen, University of Helsinki)

We have developed new math club and workshop activities in the Meaningful Mathemathics development project. As well we have organized in-service training courses for teachers ia. digitalization. In the workshop you will hear about the results and the developed materials of the project.



LUMA SUOMI: Mobile LUMA laboratory
(Juha-Pekka Salminen & Jaani Tuura, University of Turku)



LUMA SUOMI: My actions matter! & Fascinating stones
(Tarja Sipiläinen, Lappeenranta University of Technology & Päivi Porras, Saimaa University of Applied Sciences)

Workshop related to two projects:

My actions matter! provides assignments on sustainable choices and energy efficiency.

Fascinating Stones produces information on stones, how they are used in different ways, and what kind of trades are there concerning stones.



LUMA SUOMI: Programming for everyone – Scratch in primary school
(Virpi Sumu, University of Helsinki)



LUMA SUOMI: Programming in mathematics
(Einari Kurvinen, University of Turku)

This event covers teaching mathematics and programming using automatically assessed electronic exercises in ViLLE education tool and action based exercises.



LUMA SUOMI: Programming in motivating and game-based way at lower secondary school
(Mikko-Jussi Laakso, University of Turku)



LUMA SUOMI: Project-based learning in mathematics in grades 7 through 9
(Elina Viro & Sirkka-Liisa Eriksson, Tampere University of Technology)

The development project Projektioppiminen (Project-based learning) has created mathematics projects for grades 7 through 9. We present these projects and project-based learning as an educational method. Furthermore, we discuss how the projects could be adapted to teaching.



LUMA SUOMI: Skills and interest before gender
(Kirsi Ikonen, University of Eastern Finland)

In this workshop we introduce activities and materials that we have developed for encouraging children and adolescents to build their educational and occupational paths based on their interest and skills, not their gender. Central goal of these activities and materials is to increase girls’ interest to orientate towards science and technology education and occupations. Target groups of these activities and materials are students, teachers, career counsellors and students’ parents.



LUMA SUOMI: Slöjd 2.0
(Linda Mannila & Kasper Hiltunen, Åbo Akademi University)

In this project, we develop and pilot ways of working with electronics, technology and programming in the subject slöjd (craft). The development and evaluation phase is conducted in a club context, but at the end of the project the club activities will be converted into lesson plans that can be used by teachers in grades 3-6. In the presentation we present the work done and the lessons learned. Bring your own device!



LUMA SUOMI: So what?
(Sanna Mäki, University of Turku)



LUMA SUOMI: Student’s questions into a concrete use in science teaching – results of the Good question! development project
(Jaana Herranen, University of Helsinki)

Workshop will present pedagogical models developed in Good questions! development project. In the project, methods to implement student-centered education into the classroom, especially by using students’ own questions, where developed with elementary teachers. The developed models emphasize inquiry-based learning methods.



LUMA SUOMI: Understanding to the problem solving
(Anu Laine & Sirpa Wass, University of Helsinki)

How could you deal open problems with pupils? What do pupils learn while practicing problem solving? In workshop we practice to teach open ended problems. We get acquainted to the phases of a problem solving session (launch phase, explore phase & discuss and summarize phase) and teacher’s role in these phases. Especially we take up those problematic points teachers in the project have registered.



Motivation, emotions and beliefs – affective factor as the core power of mathematics learning
(Laura Tuohilampi, University of Jyväskylä)



Non-formal science education – case Children’s science school / Little engineers
(Maria Leivo, Turku University of Applied Sciences / Children’s science school)



Over a million programming exercises completed!
(Arto Vihavainen, University of Helsinki)



Polku webtool and guided self-assessment
(Lauri Hellsten, Opetus.tv)

Polku is a webtool created by Finnish teachers for utilizing guided self-assessment in the classroom. During the academic year 2015-2016 teachers have been developing math and physics content to Polku for junior and secondary high school. The material has been produced using interactive GeoGebra applets and educational videos produced for the Opetus.tv site. This workshop will introduce you to how Polku is utilized in teaching in practice.



Presentation of the LUMA Centre Finland
(Maija Aksela, LUMA Centre Finland)



Racket programming in math teaching at lower secondary school
(Eerikki Rönkkö, City of Tampere)



Resource-efficient circular economy – production of food as an example
(Marianne Juntunen, Pelkosenniemi municipality)

Interactive lecture compares Finnish biocapacity to that of other countries. We solve some of the huge issues facing the world today in small groups.



Robots occupy physics classroom
(Piia Pelander & Erkki Hautala, Innokas network)



Science teacher education today – from the student’s view
(Tanja Luostari, University of Helsinki)

How has the education of science teacher changed around past years? What are the hot topics in the science teacher education? Future of science teacher education.



ScratchJr programming for pre-school
(Jenna Tuominen, University of Helsinki)



STEM Subjects: from high school to universities
(Jouni Pursiainen, University of Oulu)

How does STEM subject choice of high school students affect student recruitment of the universities.



Study on the effectiveness of programming camps: Why science education is important specially for girls?
(Emilia Hjelm, University of Helsinki)



Supervising of Science Project – learn from Finnish Young Scientists competition experience
(Merike Kesler, Development Centre Opinkirjo & Tuula Pihlajamaa, Academic Engineers and Architects in Finland TEK)

What makes science project interesting? What kind of projects are successful in competition? What can supervisors do better? What can students do better? In workshop will be discussed the role of supervisors during the science project working process.



Text-based Python programming at lower secondary school
(Virpi Sumu, University of Helsinki)



The Earth and the Solar Wind
(Jan Holmgård, Pedersöre municipality)

Looking up at the polar sky in the winter, you may be lucky to see the Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, illuminating the sky above. We got an e-mail from the Sun! The same charged particles that give us the Aurora can also be a threat to our electrified civilization. The Beauty and the Beast. The Solar Wind is an inspiring phenomenon – an interdisciplinary bit of science.



The electronic matriculation examination in Geography: What needs to be changed in teaching geography?
(Sanna Mäki, University of Turku, & Rami Ratvio, University of Helsinki)

Geography test is among the first three exams to be arranged electronically in the autumn 2016. In this workshop we introduce the objectives and structure of the new exam as well as the different types of material and assignments. We will also discuss what needs to be changed in teaching and learning geography in the school.



The importance of the competitive attitude in finding and strengthening talent
(Pekka Pihola, Valmet Technologies)



Tilastrofi
(Jenni Räsänen, University of Helsinki, & Hannu Korhonen, City of Helsinki)

Tilastrofi is a website for schools which helps to show how the children see their life by using statistics methods. In the workshop you will learn how to use the Tilastrofi website.



Timber out of thin air! Carbon tree workshop
(Taina Ruuskanen & Miikka de Vocht, University of Helsinki)

Come and try out how changes in light, temperature and carbon dioxide influence growth of a Scots pine tree by doing your own measurements with the Carbon tree suitcase. Have you ever seen respiration of a tree and why is the cell respiration only visible only in the dark? You can continue the workshop investigations with the virtual Scots pine at www.carbontree.fi!



Turn your chemistry classroom into a learning laboratory
(Veli-Matti Vesterinen, Enni Grönlund & Katariina Säteri, University of Turku)

Advise on how to support questioning, experimentation, innovation and inquiry in what you and your students do. During the workshop you have a chance to try out some of the inquiry based laboratory tasks we use in our learning laboratory at the University of Turku. (If there are participants who do not speak Finnish, the workshop will be run also in English.)



Utilizing Mythbusters in chemistry education at lower secondary school
(Markus Mikkola, University of Jyväskylä)



Veden matka documentary
(screenplay: Jouko Rikkinen, Toni Laine & Petri Pellikka)



Visual tablet programming with AppInventorilla at lower secondary school
(Jenna Tuominen, University of Helsinki)